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Chambersburg and McConnellsburg, PA

(717) 267-2892


May 2023

Tuesday, 30 May 2023 00:00

Toe Pain

Toe pain can originate from corns, calluses, hammertoes, and bunions, as well as ingrown toenails, sprains, fractures, and dislocations. Corns develop as the toe rubs against the inside of a shoe which causes the skin to thicken as a form of protection. A corn is typically cone-shaped and has a small, hardened spot that points inward. When a corn is pressed into the skin, the toe becomes painful. Corns usually form on the top or side of the toe. A callus is also a thickened patch of skin that generally forms on the bottom of the foot. Calluses are the result of friction from the toe rubbing against the inside of a shoe. They may also occur by walking barefoot or having flat feet. A hammertoe is a bump on the knuckle of the second toe that is produced by wearing shoes that are too short for your feet. The bony protrusion rubs against the top of the shoe causing pain and irritation. A bunion is a malformation of the big toe. The base of the big toe pushes away from the smaller toes, forcing the top of the big toe to press toward the other toes. Bunions can be hereditary, or they can result from injury to the toe joint or from wearing high heels with a narrow toe box. The toe becomes inflamed, and a bump may develop at the end of the misplaced bone. Ingrown toenails typically affect the big toe and its surrounding skin. The nail will dig into the skin and become painful. Wearing tight or narrow shoes that compress the big toe causes the nail to grow into the fleshy part of the toe. Cutting toenails incorrectly can also add to the development of an ingrown toenail. A toe sprain originates from a torn or stretched ligament. Strapping the injured toe to the toe next to it for stabilization is common. A broken or fractured toe usually occurs from trauma like dropping a heavy object on it or bumping into something extremely hard and rigid. Osteoporosis, a thinning of the bones, can also bring about toe fractures. 

Any of the conditions mentioned can lead to pain and irritation. While some are more serious than others, seeking an examination and diagnosis from a podiatrist is a good idea. A podiatrist can treat each ailment and get you back on your feet again without pain.


 

Published in Featured
Tuesday, 30 May 2023 00:00

How Does a Sprained Toe Happen?

A sprained toe is a common foot condition. It can occur for a variety of reasons, that include an injury or accident causing the toe to bend beyond its normal range. When a toe is sprained, ligaments are overstretched or damaged. The toe may be swollen and bruised, and it can be painful to move, but walking is still possible. A Grade 1 sprain is known to be a mild sprain that consists of stretching of the ligaments and perhaps some microscopic tears. A Grade 2 sprain is a partial tear with more noticeable swelling and tenderness. A Grade 3 sprain happens when the ligament is completely torn, and the pain level is significant. Since it is difficult to distinguish between a sprained toe and a fractured toe, it is suggested that if you have sustained a toe injury, a podiatrist be consulted who can properly diagnose what has happened and provide appropriate treatment.

Toe pain can disrupt your daily activities. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Steven Schwartz of Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Causes Toe Pain?

Most severe toe pain is caused due to a sports injury, trauma from dropping something heavy on the toe, or bumping into something rigid. Other problems can develop over time for various reasons.

Toe pain can be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Trauma
  • Sports injury
  • Wearing shoes that are too tight
  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Corns and calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Blisters
  • Ingrown toenails
  • Sprains
  • Fractures (broken bones)
  • Dislocations

When to See a Podiatrist

  • Severe pain
  • Persistent pain that lasts more than a week
  • Signs of infection
  • Continued swelling
  • Pain that prevents walking

Diagnosis

In many cases the cause of toe pain is obvious, but in others, a podiatrist may want to use more advanced methods to determine the problem. These can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatments for toe pain and injuries vary and may include shoe inserts, padding, taping, medicines, injections, and in some cases, surgery. If you believe that you have broken a toe, please see a podiatrist as soon as possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chambersburg, and Mcconnellsburg, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog

The ankle is a hinged synovial joint made up of three bones: the tibia (shin bone), the fibula (outer ankle bone), and the talus (between the heel and leg). These three bones are bound, supported, and stabilized by strong, fibrous bands of tissue called ligaments.

A break in an ankle bone can be either traumatic or stress related. This injury may be referred to as a break or fracture. A traumatic fracture can result from tripping, twisting or rolling the ankle, falling, or by blunt impact to the ankle. These traumatic ankle breaks usually occur during sporting activities or accidents. Stress fractures, however, occur over time and are the result of repetitive stress to the ankle. These fractures sometimes occur when a new activity that engages the ankle is introduced, or when the level of activity is abruptly increased or intensified. 

There are various symptoms that accompany an ankle break. The most significant symptoms are pain and swelling that occurs in the ankle and sometimes spreads up from the foot to below the knee. Bruising or discoloration may develop eventually. It will be difficult or even impossible to put weight on the affected foot, and in severe cases there may be a visible deformity or even exposed bone.

It is very important to seek immediate treatment when an ankle break occurs or is suspected to have occurred, in order to allow the bone to properly heal and to avoid future complications such as stiff joints, limited range of motion, and osteoarthritis.

To diagnose a broken ankle, your podiatrist will first ask you to explain how the injury occurred and what your symptoms are. They will perform a thorough examination, checking for damage to nerves, blood vessels, and other structures around the injury site. They will also test your range of motion. An X-ray will need to be reviewed and, in some cases, an MRI or CT scan may be necessary.

Proper treatment of a broken ankle will depend on where and how severe the break is, how stable the ankle is, and whether the bone is displaced (misaligned or separated) or non-displaced (broken yet still aligned properly). 

Mild fractures (where the bone is non-displaced) may be treated by resting, icing, and elevating the ankle at first, followed by immobilization with a cast or walking boot. Pain and inflammation may be treated with acetaminophen. More severe or complicated fractures where bones or joints are displaced may require surgery. 

Recovery time will also vary, and it may take 4-6 weeks or longer for a broken ankle to heal. Your podiatrist will most likely order progressive X-rays or stress tests to be taken in order to monitor the healing process.

Published in Featured
Tuesday, 23 May 2023 00:00

Broken Ankle Recovery

Various parts of the foot are affected when a broken ankle occurs. The ligaments, tendons, and nerves surrounding the ankle can become damaged, which can add to the pain and discomfort that is associated. A broken ankle may happen from a fall or a heavy object dropping on it. The average recovery time for a broken ankle is approximately six weeks, and it is beneficial to slowly resume activities that require walking or running. Patients who have diabetes may notice it can take longer to recover from a broken ankle, and it can help to closely monitor blood sugar levels. Consuming healthy foods and engaging in a gentle upper-body exercise routine may lead to a faster recovery. If you have broken your ankle, it is suggested that you confer with a podiatrist who can confirm the diagnosis and begin treatment.

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact Dr. Steven Schwartz from Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Chambersburg, and Mcconnellsburg, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Broken Ankle Causes, Differences, Symptoms and Treatments
Published in Blog
Tuesday, 16 May 2023 00:00

Every Day Foot Care

Our feet are important in our everyday lives. The problem is that we tend to neglect them. When this becomes a habit, it can cause significant trouble. Ignoring foot problems can mean pain, limited mobility, and expensive doctor's visits. On the other hand, if feet are cared for and looked after regularly, they will perform without pain or complication.

Routine hygiene is the most basic way to care for the feet. Wash and dry them thoroughly daily. Remember to get between the toes and keep the toenails trimmed and short. If the feet feel dry or there are signs of dryness or cracking, use a moisturizer designed for the feet.

When using moisturizer on the feet, try to avoid applying between the toes. If cream or lotion sits too long, they can cause fungal and bacterial growth. When moisturizer is used between the toes, it can also cause the skin to soften too much.

Shoes are also an important aspect of foot care. When one is picking out shoes, make sure they are the correct size. Shoes need to be snug, but not too tight. On the other hand, if shoes are too loose they can cause foot problems as well. It is highly recommended that shopping for new shoes be done later in the day. The reason for this is that the feet will have settled and swelled to their full size by then. To keep your feet at their most healthy, avoid wearing high heels or flip flops too often. Instead, choose shoes that are good for your feet. Good shoes pad the soles of your feet and support the arches and ankles.

Socks should also be worn daily with closed-toe shoes. They may feel hot during the summer months, but they absorb sweat and moisture off the feet. Without socks, the build-up of sweat in a closed-toe shoe can cause fungal problems and athlete's foot.

The best thing to remember in every day foot care is that shoes do make a difference. If you spend a lot of time on your feet, make sure that your shoes show no signs of wear. Shoes should offer ample support for the arches and the overall foot. Additionally, try to make foot cleaning and maintenance a daily habit. If you keep these things in mind, your feet will stay healthy and safe.

Published in Featured
Tuesday, 16 May 2023 00:00

Effective Care Tips for Healthy Feet

The feet are one of the areas of the body that are often neglected. Painful foot conditions may develop as a result of this, and may easily be avoided when everyday foot care methods are implemented. These can begin with maintaining a healthy weight, which can protect the feet from enduring extra pressure. After the feet are washed and dried daily, it is beneficial to apply a good moisturizer, which can help to keep the skin looking and feeling smooth. An extremely important foot care tip consists of wearing shoes that fit correctly. It is noted to be one of the best preventive measures that can help with mobility, in addition to maintaining maximum comfort. The feet are the foundation of the body, and stretching the feet is a good way to keep them strong. If you would like more information about effective foot care techniques, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can provide you with the information you are seeking. 

Everyday foot care is very important to prevent infection and other foot ailments. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Steven Schwartz from Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Everyday Foot Care

Often, people take care of their bodies, face and hair more so than they do for their feet. But the feet are a very important aspect of our bodies, and one that we should pay more attention to. Without our feet, we would not be able to perform most daily tasks.

It is best to check your feet regularly to make sure there are no new bruises or cuts that you may not have noticed before. For dry feet, moisturizer can easily be a remedy and can be applied as often as necessary to the affected areas. Wearing shoes that fit well can also help you maintain good foot health, as well as making it easier to walk and do daily activities without the stress or pain of ill-fitting shoes, high heels, or even flip flops. Wearing clean socks with closed shoes is important to ensure that sweat and bacteria do not accumulate within the shoe. Clean socks help to prevent Athlete’s foot, fungi problems, bad odors, and can absorb sweat.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chambersburg, and Mcconnellsburg, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Every Day Foot Care
Published in Blog
Friday, 12 May 2023 00:00

Do Your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 09 May 2023 00:00

Benefits of Becoming a Podiatrist

The job of a podiatrist is to treat foot conditions. These can include bunions, hammertoes, or a multitude of ailments that affect the lower extremities. A benefit of choosing podiatry as a career can be a desirable work-life balance. This may be a result of having limited emergencies and a predictable work schedule. The education requirements to become a podiatrist begins with obtaining a bachelor's degree, followed by enrolling in an accredited podiatry school. This will earn the potential doctor a degree that is called Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, or DPM. This will take four years to complete, and courses such as biology, anatomy, and pathology will be taught. After this is completed, a residency program begins for three years, giving the candidate an opportunity to interact with patients. People who are interested in pursuing a career in podiatry are urged to speak with this type of doctor, who can help them determine if this is a right choice for them.

If you are experiencing pain in the feet or ankles, don’t join the stubborn majority refusing treatment. Feel free to contact Dr. Steven Schwartz from Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Podiatrist?

Someone would seek the care of a podiatrist if they have suffered a foot injury or have common foot ailments such as heal spurs, bunions, arch problems, deformities, ingrown toenails, corns, foot and ankle problems, etc.

Podiatric Treatment

A podiatrist will treat the problematic areas of the feet, ankle or lower leg by prescribing the following:

  • Physical therapy
  • Drugs
  • Orthotic inserts or soles
  • Surgery on lower extremity fractures

A common podiatric procedure a podiatrist will use is a scanner or force plate which will allow the podiatrist to know the designs of orthotics. Patients are then told to follow a series of tasks to complete the treatment. The computer will scan the foot a see which areas show weight distribution and pressure points. The podiatrist will read the analysis and then determine which treatment plans are available.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Chambersburg, and Mcconnellsburg, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What is a Podiatrist?
Published in Blog
Tuesday, 09 May 2023 00:00

What is a Podiatrist?

The branch of medicine that is focused on the treatment, diagnosis, and study of disorders of the lower leg, ankle and foot is referred to as podiatry. Because people often spend a great deal of their time on their feet, many problems in this area can occur. A person seeks help from the field of podiatry when they need treatment for heel spurs, bunions, arch problems, deformities, ingrown toenails, corns, foot and ankle problems, infections, and problems with the foot that are related to diabetes and additional diseases.

To treat problems of the foot, ankle or lower leg, a podiatrist may prescribe physical therapy, drugs, perform surgery, or set fractures. Individuals may also be recommended to wear corrective shoe inserts, custom-made shoes, plaster casts and strappings in order to correct deformities.

When trying to gather information on a patient problem, a scanner or force plate may be used in order to design orthotics. During this procedure, patients are told to walk across a plate that is connected to a computer; the computer then takes a scan of the foot and indicates weight distribution and pressure points. The computer readouts will give the podiatrist information to help them determine the correct treatment plans.

Diagnosis is also provided through laboratory tests and x-rays. Through the foot, the first signs of serious problems such as heart disease, diabetes and arthritis can show up. For example, individuals that have diabetes may frequently have problems such as infections and foot ulcers because they experience poor circulation in the foot area. A podiatrist can then have consultations with patients when symptoms arise. Referrals will then be made to specialists that handle the greater health problems.

Some podiatrists have their own independent, private practices or clinics where they have a small staff and administrative personnel. Many podiatrists work within group practices. They usually spend time performing surgery in ambulatory surgical centers or hospitals, or visit patients in nursing homes. Podiatrists typically spend between 30 to 60 hours of week working. Some podiatrists specialize in public health, orthopedics, surgery, or primary care. Other fields include specialties in geriatrics, dermatology, pediatrics, diabetic foot care and sports medicine.

Some podiatrist specialists complete extra training in the area of foot and ankle reconstruction that results from the effects of physical trauma or diabetes. There are also surgeons that perform surgery of a cosmetic nature to correct bunions and hammertoes.

Published in Featured
Tuesday, 02 May 2023 00:00

Three Grades of Ankle Sprains

An ankle sprain occurs when one or more ankle ligament gets overly stretched. Ligaments are strong bands of tissue that bind and support the bones and other structures that make up the ankle. In more severe ankle sprains, the ligament(s) tear—either partially or completely—and there may be an audible popping noise at the moment of injury.

Ankle sprains are quite common and can occur when the ankle rolls outwardly (eversion) or inwardly (inversion), causing the ligament(s) to stretch beyond normal limits, or even tear. Falls, twists, or blows to the ankle during sports or other activities can cause this injury, as well as wearing improper footwear, running on uneven surfaces, or having weak ankles.

Depending on the injury’s severity, an ankle sprain will be classified as Grade I, Grade II, or Grade III. Grade I sprains involve ligament(s) being overly stretched but not torn, with symptoms of mild pain, swelling, and ankle instability. There may also be some difficulty bearing weight. A Grade II sprain usually involves a partial tear of the ligament which brings more intensity in these symptoms, along with possible bruising. With a Grade III sprain, the ligament is completely torn, the symptoms are severe, and it may not be possible to put weight on the affected foot at all. 

To diagnose and grade an ankle sprain, a podiatrist will perform a physical examination, checking for tenderness and range of motion in the ankle. For more severe sprains, X-rays or other imaging studies may be necessary. 

It is vitally important to have an ankle sprain treated properly as improper healing often leads to future ankle sprains and possibly even chronic ankle stability. Treatment for an ankle sprain will vary, depending on its severity, and may include the RICE method (Rest/Ice/Compression/Elevation), physical therapy, bracing, medications, and possibly even surgery to repair a torn ligament. Rehabilitation is very important for the sprain to heal properly and to restore functionality.

Published in Featured
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